Magnolia grandifloraMagnolia grandiflora

  • BOTANICAL NAME: Magnolia grandiflora
  • PRONUNCIATION:
    mag-NOL-i-a grand-i-FLOR-a
  • COMMON NAME: Southern Magnolia
  • FAMILY: Magnoliaceae
  • NATIVITY:  North Carolina south to Florida and west to Texas, primarily in the coastal plains
  • GROWTH HABIT:  Generally low-branching and pyramidal though showing great variation among cultivars.
  • SIZE: 60 - 80' tall, 30 to 50' spread
  • HARDINESS: Zone 7 - 9
  • CULTURE: Full or partial sun with moist, well-drained, slightly acidic, fertile soil.  In northern limits it needs a sheltered location.  Best time for transplanting is late winter/early spring.
  • SUCCESSIONAL STATUS:  Climax
  • FACULTATIVE STATUS:  Facultative
  • LANDSCAPE USE:  Specimen plant; may be used in groupings to create a screen or hedge.
  • FOLIAGE: Dark green above light green below, sometimes with rust-colored pubescence on underside.
  • BUDS: Rust-brown colored, tomentose, 3/4" - 1 1/4" long.
  • BARK: Smooth gray.
  • FLOWERS: Creamy white, 8 - 12" in diameter.
  • FRUIT: Rose red, 3 - 5" long. Ripen in September, October, November.
  • PROPAGATION: Seed.
  • PESTS: None serious.
  • CULTIVARS:

 

 

 

University of Delaware

University of Delaware Botanic GardensNewark, DE 19716Phone: 302 831-0153