Coursework and teacher Assistantship

Coursework is primarily based on the career objectives of each student. Introductory level graduate courses in Museum Studies and Statistics are required during the first semester of the Program. Thereafter, students develop a course of study in concert with the Program Director, which allows the student to focus on specific public horticulture disciplines in preparation for job placement. Example disciplines could be, but are not limited to, education and programming, plant collections curation, horticultural research, fundraising and development, policy and planning, facilities management, human resources, leadership cultivation, and plant records and mapping. Individuals wishing to pursue a Ph.D., following the M.S. in Public Horticulture, will be advised with that goal in mind.

Fellows often take coursework in the following Departments:


Urban Affairs and Public Policy (UAPP)

Courses offered through the UAPP Department cover topics related to urban affairs, public policy, and public administration. Fellows have found courses in UAPP to be engaging, challenging and thought provoking, attracting a diverse student body in both origin and professional experience. Please refer to the UAPP Web site for a complete description and listing of available courses, but the following have been recommended by Former Fellows:

UAPP 609 Financial Statement Analysis for Nonprofits
UAPP 629 Theory and Practice of Historic Preservation
UAPP 630 Methods in Historic Preservation
UAPP 642 Strategic Planning: Public/Nonprofit Organizations
UAPP 644 Grantsmanship and Proposal Writing
UAPP 645 Civic Engagement
UAPP 655 Geographic Information Systems in the Public and Nonprofit Sectors
UAPP 667 Values and Ethics of Leadership
UAPP 667 Environmental Institute Management
UAPP 689 IT Skills for Planning and Administration
UAPP 694 Financial Management for Public and Non-Profit Sectors
UAPP 810 Political Economy of the Environment
UAPP 835 Organization and Management in the Public and Nonprofit Sector
UAPP 841 Management and Governance of NPO's


Business Administration (BUAD)

All coursework offered though the University’s MBA Program is open to Longwood Graduate Program Fellows. MBA courses have been found to be valuable in developing personal and group managerial and decision-making skills, addressing issues of international business, and building successful professional relationships. Please refer to the BUAD Web site for a complete listing of available courses, but the following have been recommended by Former Fellows:

BUAD 667 Sustainability and Green Business
BUAD 800 Financial Reporting and Analysis: MBA Accounting
BUAD 840 Ethical Issues in Domestic and Global Business Environments
BUAD 870 Understanding People in Organizations
BUAD 871 Managing for Creativity and Innovation
BUAD 878 Leadership in International Business Cultures


Statistics (STAT)

All First Year Fellows are required to take a statistics course in their first semester of study. This course is an introduction to statistical analysis that will help prepare one for thesis research. Please refer to the STAT Web site for a complete listing of available courses.

STAT 608 Statistical Research Methods


Museum Studies (MSST)

The University offers many courses in Museum Studies of which MSST 667 is required of all First Year Fellows. This course offers a good overview of museum history, resources, and issues of non-for-profit management. Further study in the MSST coursework offerings provides an in-depth look at many important topics of the museum world. Please refer to the MSST Web site for a complete listing of available courses.

MSST 667 Introduction to Museums: Traditions & Challenges
MSST 667-010 Green Museums
MSST 803 Museums and Modern Technology
MSST 808 Museum Education and Interpretation


Plant and Soil Science (PLSC)

The Plant and Soil Science Department, of which the Longwood Gradate Program is a part of, offers advanced coursework in soil physics, plant pathology, plant taxonomy and on many other related fields. PLSC also offers Fellows selected, non-paid opportunities for Teaching Assistant positions. Please refer to the PLSC Web site for a complete listing of available courses. This course has been taken and recommended by Former Fellows:

PLSC 604 Taxonomy
PLSC 615 Vascular Plant Anatomy
PLSC 629 Introduction to Fungi


Political Science (POSC)

This department offers coursework in topics related to politics and public policy. Fellows have found courses in POSC to be very rewarding, providing an in depth, unbiased view into specific issues. Please refer to the POSC Web site for a complete listing of available courses. This course has been taken and recommended by Former Fellows:

POSC 656 The Politics of Disaster


History (HIST)

This department offers coursework for those interested in historic landscape preservation. Please refer to the HIST Web site for a complete listing of available courses. This course has been taken and recommended by Former Fellows:

HIST 667 American Vernacular Landscape

 

Education (EDUC)

This department offers coursework for those interested in education or honing in on their research skills. Please refer to the EDUC Web site for a complete listing of available courses. This course has been taken and recommended by Former Fellows:

EDUC 846 Data Analysis/ Educational Decision Making


Click here for a complete list of University Departments.

 



Teacher Assistantships (TA Opportunities)

Teacher Assistantships offer Fellows the opportunity to instruct portions of courses which develops teaching skills, to work alongside professors, and to learn more on a specific subject of interest. Here are current TA opportunities recommended by current or former Fellows:


PLSC 214 Indigenous Woody Plants of the Eastern United States

Details: Teach an undergraduate lab section that focuses on field identification. You are not required to be a plant expert by any means; you'll cover each week's new plants ahead of your own lab section with Dr. Frett. You also don't need to learn the background information on each species which the students are required to learn during lectures, although you are free to go to lectures yourself if you want.

Benefits: You learn to identify a lot of new plants (that is, if you weren't already familiar with Eastern US woody plants); teaching and public speaking experience; extra exercise weekly.